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Google Chrome 52 for both Windows and Mac comes with a new Material design look. This new user interface is flat with a number of icons changed. You will notice that the tab shapes, icons, the omnibox are all changed. Thankfully, Google kept an option to get back to the old design if you do not like the new one. Here’s how to get Chrome‘s old look back replacing the new Material design user interface.

Google Chrome Team has promoted Chrome 52 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. A list of changes in the latest Google Chrome update, Chrome 52.0.2743.82, is available here.

If you already use Google Chrome you don’t need to worry about downloading the latest version manually. The web browser should download the update and install it automatically.

Google today released Chrome 48 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Chrome 48 adds custom notification buttons and removes support for unsecure RC4 encryption. If you have Google Chrome installed, your browser should have silently updated already. You can confirm it by looking at the version number displayed in the About window. You can also manually check for update using the same. Chrome’s built-in updater will start updating your browser if it has not done it yet. You can also download Chrome directly from google.com/chrome.

Adobe has released Adobe Flash Player update v. 20.0.0.267 to fix at least 19 security flaws in the program, including one 0-Day bug that is already being actively exploited in attacks. The new Flash Player update is available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux users.

The new Adobe Flash update v. 20.0.0.267 includes a fix for a 0-Day vulnerability (CVE-2015-8651), which according to Adobe is being actively used in “limited, targeted attacks.”

The Star Wars – The Force Awakens was released last Friday. In the first weekend the movie broke several box office records in North America. For an epic movie like Star Wars, spoiler alerts are a nuisance for every fan yet to watch it themselves.

It does not matter if you are a new or a die-hard Star Wars fan, after waiting with anticipation to go and watch the movie yourself and find out the story, it would be a shame if you stumbled upon a web page where someone has spoiled about the movie.

Web browsers are the window to the open world of Internet. It doesn’t matter which operating system you are using, web browser is your most used application. Today’s cloud centric approach towards everything makes browsers a necessary. That’s one reason cyber-criminals loves your browser so much. They try to manipulate browser settings in many ways. Sometimes, it’s a pesky toolbar that doesn’t go away easily. Sometimes they change browser settings, your browser home page or tabs that redirects you to a malicious website of their choice. Almost all popular web browsers now enhances its functionalities using add-ons or extensions. Be it Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera or Safari, all supports add-ons or extensions. Unwanted and malicious browser add-ons and extensions thus has become a popular way to infect the browser. Although most web browsers comes with a reset button that are supposed to clean up your browser. Most of the time the reset button doesn’t hold well against the hard to get rid of unwanted items or settings. That’s when you need third-party tools like Avast Browser Cleaner to clean up your browser. Now, Google has released its own tool, aptly named “Software Removal Tool” to clean up Chrome web browser.

Adobe has released security updates for Adobe Flash Player for all platforms. Adobe Flash Player 11.5.502.149 security update is released for Windows and Macintosh, Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.262 for Linux, Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.37 for Android 4.x, and Adobe Flash Player 11.1.111.32 for Android 3.x and 2.x are released. Security update for Windows and Macintosh addressed issues which are rated critical by Adobe. For all supported platforms, these updates addresses vulnerabilities referred as CVE-2013-0633, CVE-2013-0634 (details later). These vulnerabilities could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected computer system and may cause a crash.

Out of the two vulnerabilities discovered in Adobe Flash Player, Adobe reports that CVE-2013-0633 is being exploited in the wild. It is a targeted attack designed to trick a user to open a Microsoft Word document. The document is sent via email and has malicious Flash (SWF) content. It targets the ActiveX version of Flash Player on Windows. Similarly, Adobe reports that CVE-2013-0634 is also being exploited in the wild. The attacks targeting this vulnerability is delivered via malicious Flash (SWF) content hosted on websites that target Flash Player in Firefox or Safari on the Macintosh platform. It can also affect Windows users in similar way as CVE-2013-0633.

With more and more zero-day vulnerabilities are uncovered which is affecting Oracle’s Java plugin, users are now often asking how to disable Java or remove Java from their Windows computers or Mac platform.

First, let us clear the confusion which arises among most users about Java and JavaScript, keep in mind that both are different. Java is a programming language and computing platform that powers programs including utilities, games, and business applications, which was first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995, now developed and maintained by Oracle. While, JavaScript is an open source scripting language used to create dynamic websites and enhance user interfaces.

Looking at the increasing number of zero-day flaws that are getting uncovered, its advised that you do not to install Java at all, if you never felt the need of it. If you need Java for some important work, then you should only enable it when you need it. For the rest of the time you should keep Java plugin disabled in your browsers and you should also disable Java on Windows or OS X operating system.

Windows 8 flaunts two different user interfaces, the new modern “Metro” interface and the classic desktop interface. Now, the problem with this is if your favorite web browser supports the new interface, you will actually end up using two versions of the same browser. The first version which is easily accessible through the new Windows 8 Start Page and the second through the classic desktop version. In this how to article, we will see how you can take control over this behavior of Google Chrome web browser. After completing the process, Google Chrome will be always forced to open in Windows 8 desktop regardless of where it was actually launched from.